“Planet of the Arabs”

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It’s a video montage illustrating Hollywood’s relentless dehumanization and vilification of Arabs and Muslims. You can view it here or here. Powerful and disturbing.

planet of the arabs.jpg

Update: Patrick S. O’Donnell writes (see “comments” for the full text of his observations) :

I would recommend the following … for those wanting to learn a bit more about this dehumanization and vilification:

Said, Edward W. Covering Islam: how the media and the experts determine how we see the rest of the world. New York: Vintage, revised ed., 1997.

Shaheen, Jack G. Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People. New York: Olive Branch Press, 2001. …

… Saba Mahmood, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2005 [receives a glowing review on the back cover from Judith Butler],

and, Fereshteh Nouraie-Simone, ed., On Shifting Ground: Muslim Women in the Global Era. New York: Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2005 [again, on the back cover: ‘Together, these fascinating and accessible essays explode Western stereotypes about Muslim women.'].

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0 Responses to “Planet of the Arabs”

  1. Patrick Seamus says:

    Ann,

    Thanks so much for this!

    I would recommend the following two titles for those wanting to learn a bit more about this dehumanization and vilification:

    Said, Edward W. Covering Islam: how the media and the experts determine how we see the rest of the world. New York: Vintage, revised ed., 1997.

    Shaheen, Jack G. Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People. New York: Olive Branch Press, 2001.

    Keeping in mind of course that not all Arabs are Muslims and that most Muslims are not Arabs, I have a bibliography on Islamic Studies available should any readers want to further explore the cultures and civilizations of Arabs and Muslims. Books only, and in English, it is divided into 12 sections designed to convey the many dimensions of the Islamic world in all their richness, past and present. I’ll send along a Word copy on request: libertyequalitysolidarity.psod@cox.net

    Patrick S. O’Donnell

  2. Patrick Seamus says:

    And perhaps I should have mentioned above that there are a fair number of titles in the bibliography either written by women, or, falling within the rubric of ‘women and Islam’ in one way or another. Two recent titles, by way of illustration, might interest FLP devotees: Saba Mahmood, Politics of Piety: The Islamic Revival and the Feminist Subject. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2005 [receives a glowing review on the back cover from Judith Butler], and, Fereshteh Nouraie-Simone, ed., On Shifting Ground: Muslim Women in the Global Era. New York: Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 2005 [again, on the back cover: 'Together, these fascinating and accessible essays explode Western stereotypes about Muslim women.'].