ClassCrits: Constructing the Story of Class in Law, May 21-22, 2007 University at Buffalo Law School

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From the associated webpage:

This continues the goal of the first workshop, in January 2007, which was to begin to build a network of scholars interested in conceptualizing and interrogating the relationship between law, class and economic inequality. While much serious work has been undertaken in other disciplines on issues of class and economic inequality, the issue of law’s relationship to this work and these issues in the modern moment are underdeveloped. This second workshop is geared toward taking some further steps toward developing a body of legal texts and interdisciplinary scholarship exploring law and class.

This workshop will focus on building a body of comments on cases, statutues, and interdisciplinary readings that we hope will begin discussion of a”canon”or story about the place of economic class and economic inequality in U.S. law. …

Participants will submit a short, informal written comment or annotation on a case, statute, legal institution or organization, or a reading that they believe is important and useful to the project of developing a critical analysis of law and economic class. The comment should discuss the particular case, statute, legal institution or organization, or reading in light of the following questions (feel free to add to this list):

(1) what this legal source or reading shows about the concept, nature, theory, politics and operation of class or economic inequality in U.S. law;

(2) its significance for understanding and analyzing the legal construction of economic inequality or economic class

(3) the relationship of class to other intersecting categories or factors (such as gender and race)

Interested participants should submit a brief, informal abstract of their comment or annotation (one paragraph to one page) by April 23, 2007.

More information here.

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