“Opponents carry injured home-run hitter around bases”

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This story is pretty heartwarming:

With two runners on base and a strike against her, Sara Tucholsky of Western Oregon University uncorked her best swing and did something she had never done, in high school or college. Her first home run cleared the center-field fence.

But it appeared to be the shortest of dreams come true when she missed first base, started back to tag it and collapsed with a knee injury.She crawled back to first but could do no more. The first-base coach said she would be called out if her teammates tried to help her. Or, the umpire said, a pinch runner could be called in, and the homer would count as a single.

Then, members of the Central Washington University softball team stunned spectators by carrying Tucholsky around the bases Saturday so the three-run homer would count – an act that contributed to their own elimination from the playoffs. …

Read the whole thing here, it’s great.

Via Sharon Sandeen, who notes: “What an inspiring story! This is why I love women’s sports and why you should follow it more.”

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0 Responses to “Opponents carry injured home-run hitter around bases”

  1. bob coley jr says:

    This should be made into a book or movie or something with the money going to the women’s sports medicine funds at the schools or some such. Makes me proud to be human, at least part of the time!

  2. Samquilla says:

    I had to read the story 5 times (seriously, 5 times!!) before I realized that her own team was not allowed to carry her, so the opposing team did. Guess I am not a careful reader. But also shows how unexpected that kind of gesture is.

    I kept reading it going – “but they said they couldn’t help, her, and then they helped her, but the run counted, and they lost?” I was totally confused.

  3. Ann Bartow says:

    Glad you stuck with it! It’s a really nice story.

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