Query For Readers With An Interest In Internet Governance

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Is anyone interested in being involved in a new constituency at ICANN for non-commercial Internet users?   ICANN is looking to add a constituency to increase the breadth of the stakeholder representation on the Generic Name Supporting Organization (GNSO) council, which makes policy recommendations.   This is a great opportunity to use your understanding of technology, particularly the Internet, public policy and law to do something that makes a difference.   And, ICANN activities and policies make great stuff to write about in law review articles. There is some urgency as I am now writing the Intent to Form, and Application for, a new constituency.

I propose to focus the new constituency on Internet safety. I am interested in policies currently being discussed that might make it very difficult to ever address children’s access to Internet porn and parental controls, cybercrime, sex trafficking and other problems that have proliferated with the spread of the Internet, especially from the perspective of women here and in developing countries.   I believe, in this new technological era, we need to carefully balance and craft mechanisms involving both law and industry that balance unfettered free speech and anonymity with minimal protections for children and victims who are exploited on the Internet.   Or, at least we should be aware of the tradeoffs and risks.   These issues are complex, culturally and nationally diverse, and changing as we understand more about the Internet and its potential.   ICANN needs the input from thoughtful and balanced participants.

I would be happy to talk to anyone about a differing vision, or otherwise get feedback or suggestions.   If you are interested in joining the new constituency, please let me know as soon as possible.

–Cheryl Preston

Cheryl B. Preston
Edwin M. Thomas Professor of Law
J. Reuben Clark Law School
Brigham Young University
434 JRCB
Provo, UT 84602
(801) 422-2312
prestonc (at) lawgate (dot) byu (dot) edu

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