Category Archives: Feminism and Economics

An (Illegal) Feminist Bakesale

Some students at Reed College are planning a “Feminist Bake Sale for Pay Equity.”  Here are the details: The bakesale will charge men and women proportionally, based on the amount of money they earn as published by the 2008 Census … Continue reading

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Posted in Employment Discrimination, Feminism and Economics, Feminists in Academia | Comments Off on An (Illegal) Feminist Bakesale

A Woman’s Work at Home Doesn’t “Count” for Bankruptcy Purposes

The Supreme Judicial Court in Massachusetts has ruled that a woman whose work is “only” at home — meaning caring for minor children and running the household — has no property right in one-half of a federal tax refund, at … Continue reading

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Wealth, Like Tenure, is Great for Those Who Have It

In editorial in today’s New York Times, Ray Madoff (Boston College) argues in favor of treating inherited wealth as income: [I]nstead of getting into any further arguments over rates and exemptions, Democrats would be better off conceding defeat. They should … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics | 1 Comment

Do Unions Help Women Faculty?

Ann Mari May, Elizabeth Moorhouse, and Jennifer A. Bossard have published Representation of Women Faculty at Public Research Universities: Do Unions Matter? in volume 63 of the Industrial and Labor Relations Review (2010). Here is the abstract. The authors investigate the … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Employment Discrimination, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, Feminism and the Workplace, Feminists in Academia, Women and Economics | 1 Comment

Eliminate Affluent Husband Care

The controversy over law professor Todd Henderson’s “We are the Super Rich” blog entry, posted and then withdrawn from Truth on the Market (Sept. 15, 2010) seems to have missed an underlying feminist tax policy issue. Henderson argues against President … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law | 2 Comments

No-Fault? No Problem in NY

From the New York Law Journal, this news of significant changes to New York’s divorce law. Previously, New York was a “fault” jurisdiction, requiring a finding of adultery, abandonment, cruelty or a 1-year separation pursuant to a written instrument (that, … Continue reading

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Overview of Lisa Pruitt’s Recent Work on Geography, Poverty and Equality

Professor Lisa R. Pruitt (UC Davis) has published two articles that study poverty and its consequences in relation to place. In particular, she brings together the socio-geographic concept of spatial inequality (adding "where?" to the core sociological inquiry "who gets … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, Feminism and the Environment, Feminist Legal Scholarship | Comments Off on Overview of Lisa Pruitt’s Recent Work on Geography, Poverty and Equality

Brooks on “The Potential for Feminist Analysis of International Revenue Allocation”

Kim Brooks (McGill) has posted to SSRN her article “Global Distributive Justice: The Potential for Feminist Analysis of International Revenue Allocation,” 21 Canadian J. of Women & L. 267 (2009). Here is the abstract: This article has a modest aim … Continue reading

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Infanti on “Dissecting O’Donnabhain”

Tony Infanti (Pitt) has published his essay “Dissecting O’Donnabhain” in the March 15, 2010 issue of Tax Notes.   Here is the abstract: In O’Donnabhain v. Commissioner, a sharply divided Tax Court allowed a medical expense deduction for some costs … Continue reading

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Homo Economicus and Fem Eticus ?

Yuval Feldman and I have been studying the behavior of individuals in the face of organizational corruption and misconduct. In our recent article, we report on a series of experiments looking at the effect of incentives on the decision to … Continue reading

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June Carbone, “Inequality Starts At Home”

As part of the Roosevelt Institute’s ongoing ‘Feminomics’ series, running on the New Deal 2.0 blog,   June Carbone was asked to reflect on women’s changing roles in the economy. Her essay is available here and was also featured on … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Families, Women and Economics | 3 Comments

Call for a “New Deal” Feminism Focused on Economics and the Workplace

In the weekend’s Washington Post, Professor Dorothy Sue Cobble (History and Labor Studies, Rutgers) writes, “It’s Time for a New Deal Feminism.” The American workplace is transforming, but women’s lives aren’t necessarily improving. * * * The answer is not … Continue reading

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Vani K. Borooah, Quy Toan Do, Sriya Iyer, and Shareen Joshi – “Missing Women and India’s Religious Demography”

Abstract: The authors use recent data from the 2006 National Family Health Survey of India to explore the relationship between religion and demographic behavior. They find that fertility and mortality vary not only between religious groups, but also across caste … Continue reading

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Posted in Acts of Violence, Feminism and Economics, Sisters In Other Nations, The Overrepresentation of Women, Women and Economics, Women's Health | Comments Off on Vani K. Borooah, Quy Toan Do, Sriya Iyer, and Shareen Joshi – “Missing Women and India’s Religious Demography”

New Global Gender Gap Report

The World Economic Forum published the new Global Gender Gap Report on October 27th.   It ranks countries on how equitably resources   and opportunities are allocated across their male and female populations.   It bases these rankings on data … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Politics, Sisters In Other Nations | 2 Comments

Women, Happiness, and the Marketing of Positive Thinking

Barbara Ehrenreich has a great debunking of a study that purports to show that women have become unhappier since 1972 – – – as a result, most likely, of feminism.     Ehrenreich writes that the statistical variable (one percent) … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Politics, Feminism and Science, Links, Sexism in the Media | Comments Off on Women, Happiness, and the Marketing of Positive Thinking

Elinor Ostrom of Indiana University is the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Economics in the 41-year history of the award

From the NYT: The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded on Monday to two American social scientists for their work in describing the numerous relationships within a company or among companies and individuals that shape market behavior. The … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Economics, Firsts, The Underrepresentation of Women | 1 Comment

“The study found that women were far more likely to suffer minimum wage violations than men, with the highest prevalence among women who were illegal immigrants. Among American-born workers, African-Americans had a violation rate nearly triple that for whites.”

Those are two utterly unsurprising sentences from this depressing NYT article about how often low wage workers are cheated by their employers. –Ann Bartow

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, Race and Racism, The Overrepresentation of Women, Women and Economics | Comments Off on “The study found that women were far more likely to suffer minimum wage violations than men, with the highest prevalence among women who were illegal immigrants. Among American-born workers, African-Americans had a violation rate nearly triple that for whites.”

All else being equal.

From here, via Froomkin.

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Posted in Feminism and Economics | 1 Comment

“Comprehensive Health Insurance Reform: An Essential Prescription for Women”

That is the title of a new report issued by the Congressional Joint Economic Committee, chaired by Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY). Below is the abstract: The status-quo health insurance system is serving women poorly. An estimated 64 million women lack … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, Feminism and Medicine, If you're a woman, Women's Health | 1 Comment

From the Department of Evolutionary Economics: “We find that women bid significantly higher than men in their menstrual and premenstrual phase but do not bid significantly different in other phases of the menstrual cycle.”

Two economists have posted their article “Menstrual Cycle and Competitive Bidding” to SSRN. Here is the abstract, from which the sentence in the post title was taken: In an experiment using two-bidder first-price sealed bid auctions with symmetric independent private … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Economics | 1 Comment

Why hasn’t the “degree gap” closed the “salary gap”?

Prof. Mark Perry prepared this graph: If I’m reading it correctly, women and men got the same number of college degrees in 1982. By 1983, women started obtaining more college degrees then men, and this trend has continued on into … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and the Workplace, The Overrepresentation of Women | Comments Off on Why hasn’t the “degree gap” closed the “salary gap”?

Don’t Sit Back and Wait for the Human Trafficking Disaster at the World Cup

South Africa will host the World Cup in 2010.  The Zimbabwe-based Women and Law in Southern Africa Research and Educational Trust isn’t rejoicing. [T]here are fears that the world’s most prestigious football event will negatively impact women and girls of … Continue reading

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Posted in Coerced Sex, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Sports, Sisters In Other Nations | 1 Comment

“To hell with opting out”

From Amy Benfer at Salon: Taking a cue from the title of Belkin’s most famous article, a series in the American Prospect this week titled”When Opting Out Isn’t an Option“takes a long overdue look at the women who make up … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Women and Economics | Comments Off on “To hell with opting out”

Feminism Has Made Men Happier, Or Possibly the Backlash Against Feminism Is Making Men Happier.

Language Log does a good take down of this column (mentioned here too) which discusses this study which was previously blogged about here.   Here’s a graph of the data at issue: Not exactly overwhelmingly persuasive, is it? –Ann Bartow

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The Law and Economics of the Backlash

Back in my early days of teaching I thought it might be interesting to present a feminist legal theory paper at an annual meeting of the American Law & Economics Association (ALEA). At least at that time, you had to … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, If you're a woman, Women and Economics | Comments Off on The Law and Economics of the Backlash