Category Archives: Feminism and Law

“An estimated 100,000 to 300,000 American-born children are sold for sex each year. The escalating numbers have prompted national initiatives by the F.B.I. and other law enforcement agencies, and new or pending legislation in more than a dozen states, most recently Georgia, which enacted a toughened human trafficking law this month.”

That’s a sentence pulled from this NYT article.

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Aura Bogado on “Slutwalk”

Here. She raises some issues that need to be thought through. ETA: Links to additional critiques of Slutwalks here.

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Posted in Coerced Sex, Feminism and Law, Race and Racism, Sex Trafficking | 1 Comment

feminists@law: A new UK website and journal

An exciting addition to feminist legal theory is feminists@law, a new “open access journal of feminist legal scholarship” from some folks at Kent Law School in the UK: feminists@law aims to publish critical, interdisciplinary, theoretically engaged scholarship that extends feminist … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law | 1 Comment

Barbara Lenk Confirmed for Seat on Mass. SJC

Barbara Lenk has won confirmation for a seat on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. She now becomes the first openly gay or lesbian person to sit on Massachusetts’s highest court. Here is Justice Lenk’s bio from the Massachusetts Appeals Court’s … Continue reading

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King & Spalding Fired for “Obsequious Act of Weakness”

The notoriously anti-LGBT Attorney General for the State of Virginia has fired King & Spalding in retaliation for its withdrawal from representing the U.S. House of Representatives in defending the constitutionality of the federal DOMA in court: “King & Spalding’s … Continue reading

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On Civil Marriage

Jessica Knouse, University of Toledo College of Law, is publishing Civil Marriage: Threat to Democracy in the 2012 volume of the Michigan Journal of Gender & Law. Here is the abstract. This article argues that civil marriage and democracy are … Continue reading

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Latina Lawyers Before the Supreme Court

Maria Guadalupe Mendoza has published The Thirteen Known Latina Litigants Before the Supreme Court of the United States. Here is the abstract, updated April 3, 2011. From 1935 to 2010, only thirteen known Latinas have argued before the Supreme Court … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, If you're a woman, The Underrepresentation of Women | Tagged , | Comments Off on Latina Lawyers Before the Supreme Court

MIT Releases Third Study On Status Of Women Science and Engineering Faculty

Today, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology releases a report examining the status of women faculty in science and engineering, the third such report since 1999. The upshot: There’s progress, but more needs to be done. The number of women faculty … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Employment Discrimination, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law, Feminism and Science, Feminism and the Workplace, Feminists in Academia, The Underrepresentation of Women | Comments Off on MIT Releases Third Study On Status Of Women Science and Engineering Faculty

Black on “Stalled: Gender Diversity on Corporate Boards”

Barbara Black, the Charles Hartsock Professor of Law and Director of the Corporate Law Center at the University of Cincinnati College of Law has posted to SSRN her essay, Stalled: Gender Diversity on Corporate Boards.  Here is the abstract: In … Continue reading

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Liz Glazer on “Sexual Reorientation”

Yesterday I had the good fortunate to hear an engaging talk by Feminist Law Prof Liz Glazer (Hofstra).  She was invited by the student LAMBDA organization in connection with our school’s Spotlight on Diversity Week, held annually each year.  Here … Continue reading

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Cyra Choudhury on “Exporting Subjects: Globalizing Family Law Progress Through International Human Rights”

Cyra Akila Choudhury (FIU) has posted to SSRN her article Exporting Subjects: Globalizing Family Law Progress Through International Human Rights, 32 J. Mich. Int’l Law  259 (2011) Here is the abstract: This article examines the global export of domestic U.S. legal … Continue reading

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Sisters On the Bench

Hannah Brenner, Michigan State University College of Law, is publishing Gender and the Judiciary in South Africa: A Review of the Documentary Film Courting Justice, in a forthcoming issue of the Yale Journal of International Affairs. Here is the abstract. … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminism and the Workplace, Legal Profession, Sisters In Other Nations | Tagged , | 1 Comment

The Value of a Name

Names are important.  They reflect our identity, and so the ability to keep or change them implicates our autonomy.  A recent lawsuit in Japan brings this importance into sharp relief.  There, a group of women filed suit yesterday, challenging a … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminism and Law | 3 Comments

Harassment in the Intersection: Gender, Race, and Class in the Street

When people talk about “street harassment,” they are usually talking about a man harassing a woman he doesn’t know in a public place.  They are usually talking about a man doing things like whistling, cat-calling, or offering crude commentary about … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Race and Racism, Sexual Harassment | Tagged | 3 Comments

The Look of (In)Justice

Apparently spurred by Justice Scalia’s provocative comments a few months ago regarding the constitutional rights of women (or, according to him, lack thereof), Dennis Curtis and Judith Resnik have put together a slide show over at Slate that explores different … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law | 1 Comment

Who are these people?

I just received the annual email from my dean inviting me to nominate students for several awards. I am taken aback by the criteria for the award from the National Association of Women Lawyers. The award consists of a one-year … Continue reading

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Human Rights Defenders: In the frontlines

Today is Human Rights Day, the anniversary of the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.  Some thoughts on this day, cross-posted on IntLawGrrls: Dora “Alicia” Recinos Sorto of El Salvador was shot dead in November 2009 while on … Continue reading

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Do Unions Help Women Faculty?

Ann Mari May, Elizabeth Moorhouse, and Jennifer A. Bossard have published Representation of Women Faculty at Public Research Universities: Do Unions Matter? in volume 63 of the Industrial and Labor Relations Review (2010). Here is the abstract. The authors investigate the … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Employment Discrimination, Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Law, Feminism and the Workplace, Feminists in Academia, Women and Economics | 1 Comment

Are the Media’s Representations of Supreme Court Nominees Gendered?

Renee Newman Knake and Hannah Brenner, both of Michigan State University College of Law, have published Rethinking Gender Equality in the Legal Profession: What the Media’s Depiction of Supreme Court Nominees Reveals About the Pipeline to Power as an MSU Legal … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminism and Law, Legal Profession, The Underrepresentation of Women | 1 Comment

What’s Wrong With “Women’s Rights,” and Why the US Should Ratify CEDAW Anyway

The Senate Judiciary Committee recently debated whether the United States should ratify CEDAW, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. CEDAW guarantees a wide range of equal rights to women in areas such as employment, … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminism and Politics, Sisters In Other Nations | 1 Comment

Jessie Hill on Dangerous Terrain: Mapping the Female Body in Gonzales v. Carhart

Jessie Hill has posted on SSRN a short and fascinating analysis of the graphic language used in Gonzales v. Carhart (2007), the “partial-birth abortion” case. Here is part of the abstract: This brief Article focuses on the rhetoric of the … Continue reading

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Senate Hearings on CEDAW

Earlier this week, the  Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Human Rights and the Law held a “Hearing on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women.”  The UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs, … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, If you're a woman, Sisters In Other Nations | 2 Comments

CFP: “Uniform Probate Code: Remaking American Succession Law”

From the FLP mailbox: Call for Papers The Uniform Probate Code: Remaking of American Succession Law October 21, 2011 The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel’s Legal Education Committee is organizing the fourth in a series of academic symposia … Continue reading

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Posted in Call for Papers or Participation, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law, Women and Economics | 1 Comment

Heminway on “Martha Stewart and the Forbidden Fruit”

Joan MacLeod Heminway (Tennessee) has posted to SSRN her 2009 article, Martha Stewart and the Forbidden  Fruit: A New Story of Eve, 2009 Mich. State Law Rev. 1017.  Here is the abstract: This paper narrates a biblical story – Eve’s ingestion … Continue reading

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Live Blogging “After Gender? Examining International Justice Enterprises”

I’m attending the Pace Law Review Symposium “After Gender? Examining International Justice Enterprises.”  The symposium’s goal is “to expand our understanding of the role of gender in international law.” So far, there have been opening remarks by conference organizers Matthew … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal Scholarship, Law Schools, LGBT Rights, Upcoming Conferences, Women and Economics | 1 Comment

“What separates a stereotype from reality?”

Yesterday I blogged about Flores-Villar v. United States, the pending Supreme Court case about whether the laws of citizenship can treat the foreign-born children of American men less favorably than it treats the foreign-born children of American women. Ruthann Robson … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Law | 2 Comments

In the Supreme Court Today: Sex Discrimination in Passing Your Citizenship On to Your Children

In the Supreme Court this morning, the Obama administration is defending discrimination in the law of U.S. citizenship on the grounds that other countries do it too. When a non-marital child is born outside the United States and has one … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law, Immigration | 3 Comments

Arundhati Roy, “Pity the nation that has to silence its writers for speaking their minds.”

The Hindu, a daily paper in India, reports here that a crowd of up to 100 people assembled outside the home of writer Arundhati Roy, shouted anti-Roy slogans and attempted to break into her home.  The incident is reported to … Continue reading

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Posted in Acts of Violence, Feminism and Law, Sisters In Other Nations, Socioeconomic Class | 2 Comments

Human Rights Efforts in Australia: Spotlight on the Castan Centre at Monash University

The Castan Centre for Human Rights Law at Monash University in Australia is “a non-profit, non-partisan centre focusing on the study of human rights law globally, regionally and in Australia” (see program website here).  Today the Melbourne paper The Age ran … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law, Sisters In Other Nations | 1 Comment

Are Women “Persons”?

It’s the anniversary of the “Persons Case.” If you are not a Canadian feminist legal scholar, you can learn more. -Ruthann Robson

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Firsts | 1 Comment

If Rosa Parks Got a Manicure

Jimmy A. Bell, a Bowie (Maryland) lawyer (pictured at right), has sued a Maryland nail salon for charging him $2 more for a manicure/pedicure than his female companion was charged.  He alleges “gender-based price discrimination.”  A copy of Mr. Bell’s … Continue reading

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Eliminate Affluent Husband Care

The controversy over law professor Todd Henderson’s “We are the Super Rich” blog entry, posted and then withdrawn from Truth on the Market (Sept. 15, 2010) seems to have missed an underlying feminist tax policy issue. Henderson argues against President … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Economics, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law | 2 Comments

Constitution Day – – – for Feminists?

  September 17  is “Constitution and Citizenship Day,” commemorating the signing of the Constitution in 1787.  The Congressional resolution,  codified at 36 U.S.C. § 106, also includes a  requirement of an “educational program” at all educational institutions that receive federal … Continue reading

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A Banner Year for Gay Rights Litigation

Although not necessarily the issues that most impact the day-to-day lives of LGBT people in this country, marriage and military service have been at the forefront of the gay rights movement in recent years. Efforts to reverse discriminatory policies in … Continue reading

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Kristof, “Don’t Write Off Men Just Yet”

Earlier this summer, author Nicholas Kristof responded powerfully to the Atlantic’s cover story, “The End of Men.”  In this July 2010 column for the NYT, Kristof wrote: [C]ount me a skeptic. My hunch is that we’re moving into greater gender … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law | 1 Comment

Will the Prop 8 Case Be Moot Before It Gets to the Supreme Court?

Following last week’s decision finding that California’s Prop 8 was unconstitutional, much of the talk centered around what the Supreme Court would do when presented with the question whether a ban on same-sex marriage was constitutional. The thinking is that … Continue reading

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DOMA Section Three Held Unconstitutional

In two companion cases – – – one filed by individual plaintiffs married in Massachusetts alleging a violation of equal protection and one filed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts alleging Spending Clause and Tenth Amendment issues – – – federal … Continue reading

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Overview of Lisa Pruitt’s Recent Work on Geography, Poverty and Equality

Professor Lisa R. Pruitt (UC Davis) has published two articles that study poverty and its consequences in relation to place. In particular, she brings together the socio-geographic concept of spatial inequality (adding "where?" to the core sociological inquiry "who gets … Continue reading

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SCOTUS rules in U.S. v. Stevens that law banning “crush porn” is unconstitutional infringement on free speech.

From the NYT: The Supreme Court, with only one dissenting vote, on Tuesday struck down a federal ban on videos that show graphic violence against animals. The ruling cheered free speech advocates, but it raised concerns that more animals will … Continue reading

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The Regulation of Naming

Yofi Tirosh, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University, has published A Name of One’s Own: Gender and Symbolic Legal Personhood in the European Court of Human Rights, in volume 33 of the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender (2010). Here … Continue reading

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Gender Frustrations

So I have taken a week to think about how to blog about a session that I saw last weekend at the ABA Conference.   The session was about using movies to demonstrate gender differences in negotiation  and I went … Continue reading

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An all women Supreme Court?

It’s not impossible.   The Texas Supreme Court is a testament to the possibility.   It happened eighty-five years ago,   if only for a single case. In 1925, the Texas Governor appointed three women to fill all the positions … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, If you're a woman, Legal Profession, The Underrepresentation of Women | 2 Comments

Hide That Tramp Stamp!

A friend recently told me about a panel at her law school, where judges admonished young female attorneys about wearing inappropriate clothing and groused about attorneys who let their “tramp stamps” show.  The judges were women, by the way…I thought … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Legal Profession | 1 Comment

“Maryland’s roadblock to helping victims of abuse”

WaPo article by Eileen King: The Maryland House Judiciary Committee has a reputation for being not only a place where good bills go to die but also where witnesses can expect little sympathy for having suffered from violent or sexual … Continue reading

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Naomi Cahn and June Carbone, “Blue Biology: Women, Economics, and Family Values”

Full text at the HuffPo, excerpt below: … The economy and biology are on a collision course. The latest news confirms what many women fear — wait too long and your eggs are gone. The scientific findings aren’t quite that … Continue reading

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High divorce rates and teen pregnancy are worse in conservative states than liberal states, but moral panic won’t help lower divorce rates and teen pregnancy in conservative states; education will.

Read a recent op-ed by this title written by Feminist Law Profs Extraordinare Naomi Cahn and June Carbone here! –Ann Bartow

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Coyote Publishing v. Ross Miller: 9th Circuit Upholds Restrictions on Ads for Prostitution

The opinion is available here. The ads at issue were characterized as “pure commercial speech.” Below are two excerpts in which the court explains the ways that legalized prostitution drives the demand for sex slaves and sex trafficking: The federal … Continue reading

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Importance of Honesty in Donor-Conceived Families

At the Denver Motherhood conference, I’m listening now to a talk by Wendy Kramer, co-founder and Director of the Donor Sibling Registry.  Here’s an excerpt from the organization’s “About Us” statement: The Donor Sibling Registry (DSR) was founded in 2000 … Continue reading

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U Denver Conference “Motherhood: Reclaiming Our Past, Transforming Our Future”

The conference “Motherhood: Reclaiming Our Past, Transforming Our Future” has just gotten under way at University of Denver Sturm College of Law. Dean Martin Katz (Denver) gave a blissfully short welcome, followed by Professor Judy Walsh (University of Dublin School … Continue reading

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Vulnerability, Resilience, and the State: A Feminism and Legal Theory Project Workshop:March 19 – 20, 2010 at Emory

Vulnerability, Resilience, and the State A Feminism and Legal Theory Project Workshop:March 19 – 20, 2010 575 Gambrell Hall Emory University School of Law 1301 Clifton Road, Atlanta GA 30322 Friday, March 19, 2010 4:00 pm – 6:30 pm – … Continue reading

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