Category Archives: Feminist Legal History

Patricia Hill Collins, “Lessons from Black Feminism”

Earlier this year, Patricia Hill Collins spoke at Grand Valley State University (Michigan).  Her talk, “We Who Believe in Freedom Cannot Rest: Lessons from Black Feminism,” was sponsored by the University’s Office of Multicultural Affairs, Women’s Center and LGBT Resource … Continue reading

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Black Women Activists Throughout History

Via For Harriet, this list of “27 Black Women Activists Everyone Should Know“: Ella Baker Josephine Baker Daisy Bates Mary McLeod Bethune Beverly Bond Elaine Brown Majora Carter Shirley Chisholm Septima Clark Anna Julia Cooper Angela Davis Marian Wright Edelman … Continue reading

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After More Than a Century, the Netherlands Gets a King

For the first time in 123 years, the Netherlands has a male sovereign. Queen Beatrix has abdicated, somewhat ironically on Queen’s Day, paving the way for her oldest son, Willem-Alexander, to become the nation’s king. Beatrix follows in the tradition of … Continue reading

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Bernette Johnson Becomes Louisiana’s First African American Supreme Court Chief Justice

Bernette Johnson has been sworn in as Louisiana’s first African American Supreme Court Chief Justice, succeeding Catherine (Kitty) Kimball. Chief Justice Johnson filed a federal lawsuit last year after Justice Jeffrey Victory claimed that he had more seniority than she … Continue reading

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Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands To Abdicate

Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, who has reigned since 1980, when her mother, Queen Juliana stepped down from the throne, is expected to announced her abdication in favor of her oldest son, Crown Prince Willem-Alexander, today. According to the BBC, the … Continue reading

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Gerda Lerner, Pioneering Feminist and Historian, Dies at 92

NYT obituary here. From the National Women’s History Museum: Gerda Lerner’s accomplishments and contributions to the field of women’s history have been fundamental to its development. Her many works include The Grimke Sisters from South Carolina: Pioneers for Women’s Rights … Continue reading

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Lesbian Herstory Archives Internships

From the FLP mailbox: The Lesbian Herstory Archives (located in Park Slope, Brooklyn, NYC) is looking for graduate and undergraduate students who are interested in library and/or archives with a demonstrated interest in Lesbian Studies, History and Activism. We have … Continue reading

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“On Having Fun & Raising Hell” – Symposium honoring the work of Professor Ann Scales on Saturday, March 30, 2013 at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law

“On Having Fun & Raising Hell” * Symposium honoring the work of Professor Ann Scales Saturday, March 30, 2013 Join the University of Denver Sturm College of Law to honor the life and work of Professor Ann Scales (1952-2012), author … Continue reading

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“War on Women, Waged in Postcards: Memes From the Suffragist Era”

Here. Below is one of the featured postcards.

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminism and Politics, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Yxta Maya Murray on “Anglo-American Radical Feminism’s Constitutionalism in the Streets”

Yxta Maya Murray has posted to SSRN her article ‘Creating New Categories’: Anglo-American Radical Feminism’s Constitutionalism in the Streets, 9 Hastings Race & Poverty L.J. 454 (2012).  Here is the abstract: In 1968 and 1970, U.S. and British radical feminists … Continue reading

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Posted in Activism, Feminist Legal History, Sisters In Other Nations | Comments Off

Cartoon History, Woman Suffrage and the Kewpie Doll

Comicbookgrrrl has an informative post (here) about cartoonist Rose O’Neill: Rose O’Neill is regarded as the first woman cartoonist (1874-1944). Self taught, and from a poor family, her parents ensured she was never without paper to draw on, and her … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and the Arts, Feminist Legal History, Recommended Books | Comments Off

Fenton, “An Essay on Slavery’s Hidden Legacy”

Zanita Fenton (Miami) has published An Essay on Slavery’s Hidden Legacy: Social Hysteria and Structural Condonation of Incest, 55 Howard L.J. 319 (2012).  Here is the abstract: The history of slavery and its effects within the United States, especially the … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Families, Feminist Legal History, Feminist Legal Scholarship, Race and Racism | Comments Off

Feminist Saint Joan

Blawg Review #320 is a salute to Joan of Arc: warrior, saint, and icon. Amicae Curiae editors Melissa Castan and Kate Galloway do the honors.

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Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Gender

Tracy A. Thomas, University of Akron School of Law, has published Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Notion of a Legal Class of Gender, in Feminist Legal History: Essays on Women and Law (T. Thomas and T. Boisseau, eds.; NYU Press). Here is … Continue reading

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Feminist Law Profs Interview with Sara McDougall

I recently spoke with Sara McDougall (History, John Jay College) about Professor McDougall’s book Bigamy and Christian Identity in Late Medieval Champagne (Penn Press 2012), previously blogged here, as well as Professor McDougall’s other work. Crawford Question: In the church … Continue reading

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McDougall, “Bigamy and Christian Identity in Late Medieval Champagne”

Sara McDougall (History, John Jay College) has published Bigamy and Christian Identity in Late Medieval Champagne (Penn Press 2012).  Here is the publisher’s description: The institution of marriage is commonly thought to have fallen into crisis in late medieval northern … Continue reading

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Woman Suffrage, Lady Gaga-Style

In honor of International Women’s Day, here’s a clever Gaga-inspired music video from Soomo Publishing that (loosely) is about the 19th Amendment.  Yes, all of the people in the video are white – an important reminder that the Woman Suffrage movement … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and the Arts, Feminist Legal History | 2 Comments

Barbara Walters Says Santorum is Correct About “Radical Feminism”

Newsbusters.org reprints (here) a portion of the transcript from Monday’s airing of the morning talk-show The View.  In one segment, Barbara Walters says she agrees with Rick Santorum that radical feminism is to blame for some women’s woes: BARBARA WALTERS: … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Race and Racism, Sexism in the Media | 2 Comments

2012 Annual Black History Theme = Black Women in American Culture and History

The Association for the Study of African American Life and History announced earlier this year that for 2012, the theme is “Black Women in American Culture and History.”  Here is an excerpt from the group’s announcement of the theme: From … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History | 2 Comments

Heen on “From Coverture to Contract: Engendering Insurance”

Mary Heen (Richmond) has posted to SSRN her article From Coverture to Contract: Engendering Insurance, 23 Yale J. of Law & Feminism 335 (2011).  Here is the abstract: In the 1840s, state legislatures began modifying the law of marital status … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Families, Feminist Legal History, Women and Economics | Comments Off

How Bad is “The Playboy Club”?

Pretty bad, according to Gail Dines (Wheelock College).  Here’s her take: There were so many surreal scenes in the pilot of NBC’s The Playboy Club that it is difficult to pick out the most eye-popping . . . . I … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Pornography's Harms | Comments Off

Martin Was Like Us (Kinda)

With the publicity over the new MLK memorial on the Washington Mall, several bloggers have weighed in with fresh reflections on King’s legacy.  Over at The Negro Intellectual, there’s this thoughtful commentary (originally from January 2011) on some lesser- known images of Dr. … Continue reading

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Hollywood, Historical Accuracy and the Civil Rights Era

Writer Martha Southgate reviews the novel-now-movie The Help for EW.com.  Here is an excerpt: Implicit in The Help and a number of other popular works that deal with the civil rights era is the notion that a white character is … Continue reading

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Two Perspectives on Feminism and the Legal Academy

Two recently published pieces caught my eye, and might be interesting to read in tandem.  The first is An Inconstant Affair: Feminism and the Legal Academy, by Margaret Thornton (Australian National University).  Here is the abstract: Drawing on the Australian … Continue reading

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Susan B. Anthony’s Handbag

  The Susan B. Anthony House in Rochester, New York is selling the “Ms. Anthony,” a faux alligator handbag inspired by the one that Susan B. Anthony used to carry her speeches and other items while traveling.  The bag has … Continue reading

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Latina Lawyers Before the Supreme Court

Maria Guadalupe Mendoza has published The Thirteen Known Latina Litigants Before the Supreme Court of the United States. Here is the abstract, updated April 3, 2011. From 1935 to 2010, only thirteen known Latinas have argued before the Supreme Court … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, If you're a woman, The Underrepresentation of Women | Tagged , | Comments Off

Film About Loving v. Virginia at Tribeca Film Festival

The Tribeca Film festival begins next week.  Included in the film line-up is Loving Story, a documentary about Mildred and Richard Loving.  Here is the film description: Loving v. Virginia was a watershed civil rights case in which the United … Continue reading

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Serena Mayeri, “Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution”

Anyone interested in feminist jurisprudence or rights discourse will want to read this new book by Serena Mayeri (Penn): Reasoning from Race Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution.  The publisher’s description is here. Mayeri uncovers the history of an … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History | 1 Comment

“Feminist Legal History: Essays on Women and Law”

NYU Press has published Feminist Legal History: Essays on Women and Law, edited by Tracy A. Thomas (Law, Akron) and Tracey Jean Boisseau (History, Akron). Contributors to the volume are: Carrie N. Baker Felice Batlan Tracey Jean Boisseau Eileen Boris Richard H. … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History | 1 Comment

Post Office Named in Honor of Dorothy Height

A post office near Union Station in Washington, D.C. has been renamed in honor of Dr. Dorothy I. Height.  Dr. Height was the president of the National Council of Negro Women from1957-1997.  She previously was the president of the national … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History | 1 Comment

NYPL Manuscript Collection – 20th Century New York Women’s History

I stumbled across a reference to a set of records maintained by the New York Public Library’s Manuscripts Division.  The library has approximately 33 boxes of materials from the Women’s Action Coalition: The Women’s Action Coalition Records trace the rise … Continue reading

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Video Tour of Sewall-Belmont House and Museum

The Sewall-Belmont House and Museum in Washington, D.C. (image source here) is a worthwhile stop on any tour of the nation’s capitol: The Sewall-Belmont House and Museum, on Capitol Hill in Washington DC, celebrates women’s progress toward equality—and explores the … Continue reading

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Delaying Thanksgiving Dinner for Political Commitments, 1909 Style

In November, 1909, the LA Times reported on the arrival of Emiline Pankhurst in Chicago under the headline, “Suffrage Postpones Thanksgiving Feast – Chicago Women Chanage Dinner Hour So that They May Turn Out in Full Force to Meet Mrs. Pankhurst … Continue reading

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Racialized Blame: What Virginia Thomas and Anita Hill Have to Do With It

Writing in the November 15, 2010 edition of The Nation, Professor Melissa Harris-Perry (Princeton) reacts to the news that Virginia Thomas, wife of United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, called Professor Anita Hill and asked Professor Hill to apologize: … Continue reading

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Are Women “Persons”?

It’s the anniversary of the “Persons Case.” If you are not a Canadian feminist legal scholar, you can learn more. -Ruthann Robson

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Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Firsts | 1 Comment

Kierner on “Martha Jefferson Randolph and the Performance of Patriarchy: Family, Gender, and Presidents in the Early American Republic”

On October 8, 2010, Cynthia A. Kierner (History, George Mason University) will present her paper, “Martha Jefferson Randolph and the Performance of Patriarchy: Family, Gender, and Presidents in the Early American Republic” at the Newberry Seminar on Women and Gender at … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History, Upcoming Lectures | Comments Off

Constitution Day – - – for Feminists?

  September 17  is “Constitution and Citizenship Day,” commemorating the signing of the Constitution in 1787.  The Congressional resolution,  codified at 36 U.S.C. § 106, also includes a  requirement of an “educational program” at all educational institutions that receive federal … Continue reading

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Blair LM Kelley Wins 2010 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Award

Congratulations to Professor Blair LM Kelley (History, North Carolina) who has received the 2010 Letitia Woods Brown Memorial Book Award from the Association of Black Women Historians for her book, Right to Ride: Streetcar Boycotts and African American Citizenship in the Era of … Continue reading

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Posted in Chutes and Ladders, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Joan of Arc in NYC

According to this editorial from the New York Times on August 26, 2010 edition (at A-26), New York City’s first statue of a woman was raised in 1912: This is the first statue of a woman — not a female abstraction … Continue reading

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Declaration of Independence Thoughts: Kagan Hearing and (White Male) Philosophers

Adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776, the Declaration of Independence is the foundational text for the July Fourth "Independence Day" national holiday in the United States. Among the discussions of the document this year, two stand out.  … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminist Legal History | 1 Comment

Olson, Freedom’s Daughters: A Juneteenth Story

 Lynne Olson, a former reporter, is the author of Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour (Random House 2010).  Browsing my local bookstore today — Juneteenth — it was her 2002 book, Freedom’s Daughters: … Continue reading

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Inniss on History of U.S. Slave Trade

The New York Times published Lolita Buckner Inniss’s letter to the editor in response to  Henry Louis Gates’s April 23, 2010 op-ed, “Ending the Slavery Blame-Game.”  Professor Inniss writes: To the Editor: As Prof. Henry Louis Gates Jr. points out, … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History, Race and Racism | Comments Off

The Regulation of Naming

Yofi Tirosh, Faculty of Law, Tel Aviv University, has published A Name of One’s Own: Gender and Symbolic Legal Personhood in the European Court of Human Rights, in volume 33 of the Harvard Journal of Law and Gender (2010). Here … Continue reading

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An all women Supreme Court?

It’s not impossible.   The Texas Supreme Court is a testament to the possibility.   It happened eighty-five years ago,   if only for a single case. In 1925, the Texas Governor appointed three women to fill all the positions … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, If you're a woman, Legal Profession, The Underrepresentation of Women | 2 Comments

Egerman on “Avoiding Confrontation”

Mark Egerman (Staff Counsel, National Abortion Federation) has posted to SSRN his working paper, “Avoiding Confrontation,” a a feminist critique of evidence law.  Here is a portion of the abstract: This article takes seriously Justice Scalia’s facetious aside in Giles … Continue reading

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Posted in Acts of Violence, Feminist Legal History, Feminist Legal Scholarship | Comments Off

The Feminist Theory Papers at Brown University’s Pembroke Center

From the official website: The Feminist Theory Papers is an exceptional archival collection representing scholars who have transformed their disciplines and the intellectual landscape of universities in the United States and internationally. This focused and coherent manuscript collection is indispensable … Continue reading

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Jennifer Baszile’s”The Black Girl Next Door”

Historiann has a review here. Interview with Jennifer Baszile (including readings from the book) here: –Ann Bartow

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African-American History Teaching Resources

There are some nice teaching resources for African-American history at AfroAmericanHeritage.com.   Many of the materials are geared more for primary and secondary school students, but there are some especially nice posters that would make for good law school classroom … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminist Legal History, Law Teaching | 1 Comment

Fellowships at the Massachusetts Historical Society

From the FLP mailbox, this notice of research fellowships at the Massachusetts Historical Society: The Massachusetts Historical Society will offer about 30 research fellowships for the academic year 2010-2011, including at least two long-term research fellowships made possible by the … Continue reading

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Monk and the Baroness: Nica Rothschild’s Contributions to American Jazz History

Later this month, the documentary film “The Jazz Baroness” will air on cable TV.  The film was made by the English artist (and member of the Rothschild banking family) Hannah Rothschild.  The “Jazz Baroness” explores the life of Kathleen Annie … Continue reading

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