Category Archives: Feminist Legal History

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | 2 Comments

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Via.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Today is the 27th Anniversary of Sandra Day O’Connor being sworn in as the first female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Nominated by President Ronald Reagan and unanimously approved by the Senate, Sandra Day O’Connor joined the Court on 25 September 1981 as its 102nd justice and first female appointee. –Sharon Sandeen

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Firsts | Comments Off

“Hamer’s Convention”

Interesting and moving post by this name at The Legal History Blog about Fannie Lou Hamer’s challenge to the seating of Mississippi’s all-white Democratic delegation at the 1964 DNC. –Ann Bartow

Share
Posted in Feminism and Politics, Feminist Legal History, Race and Racism | Comments Off

Josephine Louise Newcomb established an undergraduate liberal-arts college in 1886 at Tulane in memory of her daughter. Her descendants are suing to have it reopened.

Last October it was reported that a first effort to get Newcomb College reopened failed: A state appeals court today narrowly turned down an attempt to resurrect Newcomb College, ruling that the plaintiffs had no right to file suit. By … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Feminists in Academia, Firsts | Comments Off

“Narrative and Sexual Consent: Compulsory Prostitution in Progressive era New York City”

Abstract: This paper analyzes testimony about forced prostitution voiced in New York City’s Court of General Sessions from 1908 to 1915. During these years, the problem of coercive prostitution – commonly called”white slavery”– received an unprecedented amount of attention from … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Coerced Sex, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Imagining Sadie ~ Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander

“Imagining Sadie”is a short film produced by Penn Law students Haley Goldman, J.D. 2009; B.B. Liu, J.D. 2008; and Melissa Mao, J.D. 2009.   It tells the story of Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander as she exists in the imaginations of … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Firsts, Law Schools, Legal Profession | Comments Off

“We’ve Come a Long Way, Baby”

An overview of women’s political and cultural history: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, and Part 4. Like any history, it has viewpoints you may not agree with.

Share
Posted in Feminism and Politics, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Centennial Events at New England School of Law

This year the New England School of Law celebrates its centennial.   It was founded in 1908 as a women’s law school.   The school’s website (here) lists   some of the great events planned to mark the occasion, including … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Law Schools, Legal Profession | Comments Off

‘We are at War and You Should Not Bother the President': The Suffrage Pickets and Freedom of Speech During World War I

This is the title of an interesting new article from Villanova Law Professor and Jeopardy Champion Cathy Lanctot.   The abstract is below, and you can download it here: The story of Alice Paul’s National Woman’s Party and its 1917 … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Feminist Legal Scholarship | Comments Off

“Strange Sisters”

A website featuring lesbian paperback artwork from the 1950s and 1960s.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, LGBT Rights | Comments Off

Feminist buttons circa 1968 – 1972

From here!

Share
Posted in Bloggenpheffer, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Sophia Z. Lee “Hotspots in a Cold War: The NAACP’s Postwar Workplace Constitutionalism, 1948-1964″

Abstract: Throughout the Cold War 1950s, the NAACP sustained an ambitious campaign for African-American workers’ constitutional right to join unions and access decent jobs. Surprisingly, it did so not in the courts, but in executive branch agencies and committees. Blending … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Race and Racism, Women and Economics | Comments Off

Senator Margaret Chase Smith’s “Declaration of Conscience” – 58 Years Later

On June 1, 1950, Senator Margaret Chase Smith (b. 1897 d. 1995) made her “Declaration of Conscience” in the Senate.  Speaking out against McCarthyism, she said: Those of us who shout the loudest about Americanism in making character assassinations are … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

“Pinstripes & Pearls” by Judith Richards Hope

From the Powell’s Page: To illustrate the challenges facing women of her generation, author Judith Richards Hope describes the lives and careers of a handful of barrier-breaking women, including herself, from Harvard Law School’s pivotal class of 1964, who fought … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Recommended Books | Comments Off

“Suffragist City”

That’s the title of a column by academic historian Mary Beth Norton that appeared in The Nation, describing new books about important women in history. Norton writes: … Groundbreaking books by historians Judith Wellman, Lori Ginzburg and Jean Baker, among … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Recommended Books | Comments Off

Rory Dicker, “A History of U.S. Feminisms”

From this website: “The History of U.S. Feminism is an introductory text designed to be used as supplementary material for first-year women’s studies students or as a brush-up text for more advanced students. Covering the first, second, and third waves … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminist Legal History, Feminists in Academia, Recommended Books | Comments Off

Clip From Interview of Margaret Sanger By Mike Wallace on 9/21/57

See it here. Read the transcript here. Warning: Sexist cigarette ads ahoy, and Sanger’s “quip” about smoking at the end of the interview is disturbing. Actually, maybe “sad” is a better descriptor. I guess she felt she needed to plug … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Reproductive Rights | Comments Off

Verna L. Williams and Kristin Kalsem, “Social Justice Feminism”

Abstract: For the past three years, women leaders from national groups, grassroots organizations, academia and beyond have gathered to address dissonance in the women’s movement, particularly dissatisfaction with the movement’s emphasis on women privileged on account of their race, class, … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Feminist Legal Scholarship | Comments Off

Black Feminist Legacies

See Diary of an Anxious Black Woman for her “Super Post” on this topic. While you are there, read through ABW’s many excellent recent posts, especially her “Black Herstory” series.

Share
Posted in Feminist Blogs Of Interest, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

“Asian/ APIA Feminism/ Women’s History Month”

Find a fantastic, informative post by this title at WOC PhD.

Share
Posted in Feminist Blogs Of Interest, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

1943 Guide to Hiring Women, published in Transportation Magazine (UK)

Via Get Shouty: Eleven Tips on Getting More Efficiency Out of Women Employees There’s no longer any question whether transit companies should hire women for jobs formerly held by men. The draft and manpower shortage has settled that point. The … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Politics, Feminist Legal History, Sisters In Other Nations | Comments Off

Remembering Belva!

On February 15, 1879, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed legislation allowing women to be admitted to practice before the Supreme Court. Belva Lockwood became the first woman admitted to practice under the new law. Jill Norgren published her biography of … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Firsts | Comments Off

“Original Zins”

Read Historiann’s Little thoughts on biography and women’s history. Actually, you just read her blog from cover to cover, it’s great.

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminist Blogs Of Interest, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame Will Induct Rosa Parks

  Rosa Parks will be this year’s sole inductee in the Alabama Women’s Hall of Fame according to this article in the Charlotte Observer. Something about a Women’s Hall of Fame seems anachronistic to me.   If I were creating … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Firsts | Comments Off

Pre-Order Mary Dudziak’s New Book!

HERE! And, see also.

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Feminist Legal Scholarship, Recommended Books | Comments Off

The Brandeis Brief

I’m teaching Muller v. Oregon (1908) on Thursday. For those who don’t recall it, it’s the case during the Lochner era in which the Court upheld a maximum hour statute because the statute applied solely to women. The opinion has … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

“Nudity Required, No Pay.”

Via the awesome Nancy McClernan, “Nudity Required, No Pay” is a blog that tracks exploitive treatment of actors. The blog author, Gabby, notes: I’ve been a struggling actress for the last few years. When I first started off, it seemed … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

The Study of “Women” vs. the Study of “Gender”

Historian Alice Kessler-Harris asks in yesterday’s Chronicle of Higher Education, “Do We Still Need Women’s History?”   She reflects on the shift in the study of “women’s history” to historical perspectives  on “gender:”   The shift to gender has had … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Women and the Nineteenth Century Origins of a National Thanksgiving

On the origins of Thanksgiving as a national holiday, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History features this article, “Giving Thanks: Women Move to Create a Holiday” on its sponsored website historynow.org: [T]he idea of a permanent, national day of … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Griswold Attorney Catherine G. Roraback Dies at 87

Yesterday, Catherine G. Roraback died at the age of 87.   She represented the appellants in Griswold v. Connecticut.   A short bio is here.   Some key excerpts: Long before the advent of public interest law Roraback made it … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Feminists in Academia | Comments Off

Historical Feminist Videography

A wonderful collection of clips, via Open Vault (a project of WGBH Public Television) via Dr. Bitch.

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

“The First and the Forced”: Indigenous and African American Intersections

This conference took place last fall, but most of the presentations were recorded and can be watched here. Via the Oh No a WoC PhD blog.

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Race and Racism | Comments Off

Nicola Lacey, “From Moll Flanders to Tess of the D’Urbervilles: Women, Automony and Criminal Responsibility in Eighteenth and Nineteenth Century England”

The abstract: In the early 18th Century, Daniel Defoe found it natural to write a novel whose heroine was a sexually adventurous, socially marginal property offender. Only half a century later, this would have been next to unthinkable. In this … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Upcoming Conference:”The New Face of Women’s Legal History”

Renowned legal and history scholars from across the nation will gather at The University of Akron School of Law on Oct. 19 for a constitutional law symposium titled”The New Face of Women’s Legal History.” The symposium’s broad theme will address … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History, Reproductive Rights, Upcoming Conferences | Comments Off

Paulina Wright Davis: Women’s Rights Advocate and Publisher

Paulina Kellogg Wright Davis, born on August 7, 1813, was the editor and publisher of The Una: A Paper Devoted to the Elevation of Woman.   Women’s history researchers can consult copies of the paper preserved in the Rare Book … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Remembering the Victims of the Holocaust

Today I visited the Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp, outside of Berlin.   The camp’s watchtower  appears in the photo at right.   I learned many things on this visit – among them, that the camp had a brothel for the male … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

The Nazis Ran Prison Brothels

Not really a surprise but not something that received much attention in the past. From Yahoo News: For decades no one wanted to remember the concentration camp “special blocks” where the Nazis forced female inmates to entertain their male peers. … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Acts of Violence, Feminist Legal History, Sexism in the Media | Comments Off

The Guerrilla Girls at the Feminist Future Symposium, MoMA

Watch it here.

Share
Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Sexism in the Media | Comments Off

Declarations of Independence

From the Declaration of Sentiments at Seneca Falls (1848): When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one portion of the family of man to assume among the people of the earth a position different from that … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Elizabeth Foyster, “Marital Violence: An English Family History, 1660-1857″

From the books’ webpage: This book exposes the ‘hidden’ history of marital violence and explores its place in English family life between the Restoration and the mid-nineteenth century. In a time before divorce was easily available and when husbands were … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Julia Ward Howe’s “Cultivation of the Mind”

 Julia Ward Howe (b. May 27, 1819; d. Oct. 17, 1910) got the usual blogosphere attention around Mother’s Day — lots of “Arise, then, women of this day!”  and Battle-Hymn-of-the-Republic-as peace-movement, etc.   Howe articulated a special role for women … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

A writer, economist, and lecturer, Charlotte Perkins Gilman was an early theorist of the feminist movement. According to The Charlotte Perkins Gilman Society: Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935) was born in New England, a descendent of the prominent and influential Beecher … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History, Feminists in Academia | Comments Off

Evelyn Munro

From her LA Times obituary: Evelyn Smith Munro, a longtime activist who fought for sharecroppers’ rights in one of the nation’s first racially integrated labor unions, died of natural causes Feb. 16 at her Laguna Beach home. She was 92. … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Culture, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

With Drew Gilpin Faust’s appointment as President of Harvard, half of the eight Ivy League schools will have a woman as president.

Harvard’s announcement here. NYT story here. Update: Mary Dudziak had this on Friday, with some interesting links.

Share
Posted in Academia, Feminist Legal History | Comments Off

The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger

Volume I: The Woman Rebel, 1900-1928 The birth control crusader, feminist, and reformer Margaret Sanger was one of the most controversial and compelling figures inthe twentieth century. This first volume of The Selected Papers of Margaret Sanger documents the critical … Continue reading

Share
Posted in Feminism and Law, Feminist Legal History, Recommended Books, Reproductive Rights, Women's Health | Comments Off