Author Archives: Jennifer Hendricks

Call for Papers: Feminist Legal Theory CRN at Law and Society 2013

Dear friends and colleagues, We write to invite you to participate in panels sponsored by the Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network at the Law and Society Annual Meeting in Boston, May 30 to June 2, 2013. Information about the … Continue reading

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Call for Papers: Feminist Legal Theory at Law & Society (Honolulu, June 2012)

The Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network (CRN) is a newly-constituted  group that seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. At our inaugural get-together at the Law and Society Association … Continue reading

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Invitation and Call for Papers: Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network, January 2012

The Feminist Legal Theory Collaborative Research Network is a newly-constituted group that seeks to bring together scholars across a range of fields who are interested in feminist legal theory. At our inaugural get-together at the Law and Society Association meeting … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Call for Papers or Participation, Feminism and Law | 7 Comments

Correlation is not Causation

Why, why, why do people continue to ignore this simple rule–including people who presumably know better but who invoke a correlation as a lazy rhetorical device? In The Atlantic this month, neuroscientist David Eagleman writes about biological bases for criminal … Continue reading

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Posted in Acts of Violence, Feminism and Law, Feminism and Science, Masculinity, Prisons and Prisoners, Race and Racism | 1 Comment

Erasing Women (or, Where Are the Women? Der Tzitung edition)

You may have already read about the newspaper Der Tzitung, which excised Hillary Clinton and Audrey Tomason from a White House photograph because of a religious aversion to printing photographs of women. The paper apologized “if this was seen as … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Religion, Sexism in the Media | Comments Off

A Classroom Experiment

I’m teaching Race and the Law for the first time this semester. Last week we spent some time with Ricci v. DeStefano (the New Haven firefighters’ case) as a way of discussing disparate treatment and disparate impact doctrine. They had … Continue reading

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Who are these people?

I just received the annual email from my dean inviting me to nominate students for several awards. I am taken aback by the criteria for the award from the National Association of Women Lawyers. The award consists of a one-year … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Feminism and Law | Comments Off

Jessie Hill on Dangerous Terrain: Mapping the Female Body in Gonzales v. Carhart

Jessie Hill has posted on SSRN a short and fascinating analysis of the graphic language used in Gonzales v. Carhart (2007), the “partial-birth abortion” case. Here is part of the abstract: This brief Article focuses on the rhetoric of the … Continue reading

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Posted in Academia, Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Law, Reproductive Rights, Women's Health | Comments Off

Condescending to Girl Athletes

My husband and I spend a lot of time volunteering for our son’s soccer league. Hubby recently refereed a game for eight- and nine-year-old girls in which he called several handballs. A male coach objected strenuously to a couple of … Continue reading

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Posted in Feminism and Sports, Primary and Secondary Education | 1 Comment

“What separates a stereotype from reality?”

Yesterday I blogged about Flores-Villar v. United States, the pending Supreme Court case about whether the laws of citizenship can treat the foreign-born children of American men less favorably than it treats the foreign-born children of American women. Ruthann Robson … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Law | 2 Comments

In the Supreme Court Today: Sex Discrimination in Passing Your Citizenship On to Your Children

In the Supreme Court this morning, the Obama administration is defending discrimination in the law of U.S. citizenship on the grounds that other countries do it too. When a non-marital child is born outside the United States and has one … Continue reading

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Posted in Courts and the Judiciary, Feminism and Families, Feminism and Law, Immigration | 3 Comments